fuel

Day 5: Safe Use of your fires/woodburners/AGA etc…

We know that you most likely know all of this…but…here’s a prompt. It might just be worth a read to keep you safe.

BEFORE LIGHTING

If you have just moved into a home, whether you have an open fire or an open or ‘closed’ wood burning or multi-fuel stove, unless you have proof that the chimney (or flue) has been swept recently obtain the services of a trained professional chimney sweep and have it swept.

The following applies to all the above appliances:

Ensure there is sufficient air available to the appliance to enable it to burn efficiently.  If there are air bricks or vents ensure they are open and not blocked or covered.  Ensure the fuel is dry and as in the case of wood, is of the correct type and has been allowed to ‘season’ properly (this will be explained later).  Damp or wet fuel will lose a large amount of it’s heat ‘energy’ if it has to dry out fully before burning.

FUEL

Some appliances, such as open fires, can burn a variety of fuels, some are more limited.  Please check with a ‘qualified’ person or the instruction book of your particular appliance if in doubt.

See our blog on Fuel!

LIGHTING THE FIRE

The following are general guidelines for lighting open fires and woodburners /multi fuel stoves.  Ask anyone and they’ll tell you that, until you’re experienced with your type of appliance it’s all a bit ‘hit and miss’ or ‘trial and error’.

OPEN FIRES

Before the first fire of the year or after a period of time when the fire hasn’t been lit in cold weather it might be best to warm the flue before lighting.

Lightly crumple 6 to 10 pieces of newspaper in the grate or woodburner – light it, this will warm the flue and assist the convection.  If a small amount of newspaper smoke enters the room initially this usually doesn’t cause too much inconvenience.

  • Begin with a bed of newspapers either lightly crumpled or long pieces rolled up and knotted in the middle.
  • Arrange small pieces of kindling wood either laid in a lattice across the newspaper or stood up in a ‘tepee’ shape.
  • If required fire lighters can also be used. These are often wax blocks impregnated with paraffin or similar.  Natural versions are also available.
  • If using coal arrange some around the paper and kindling leaving air gaps around the fuel to assist the burn then, using a long stem match or a purpose made gas fire lighter, for safety, light the newspaper.
  • Add coal or small logs slowly as the kindling burns to encourage a ‘bed’ of embers. Top up with coal or wood as required.

With thanks to Wikipedia – logs!

WOODBURNERS/MULTI FUEL STOVES

If the fire has not been lit for a while, especially in cold weather, warm the flue as per ‘open fires’. Laying the initial fire is the same as for open fires except that you must not use coal or smokeless fuel unless the appliance and flue are specifically designed to burn this type of fuel.

Check with the manufacturer’s instructions as to which vents to open whilst lighting the appliance; in the event these are not available best to start with all vents open and close the top ones first and then the bottom as the fire gets established.

If you’ve not been left any instructions you might find guides online.

ONCE LIT

Fairly straightforward really, add the appropriate fuel as necessary remembering not to allow the appliance to get too hot. A stove thermometer is ideal to guide you – especially one colour coded for ideal burning temperatures.

Don’t slumber a stove  if you are burning wood (whether ‘seasoned’ or not) as this could form creosote (tar) in the chimney/flue which is highly flammable and could catch fire or block the flue causing the danger of Carbon Monoxide poisoning.

WHEN FINISHED

When you no longer need the fire, usually at bedtime, try to remember not to put any more fuel on for a half to one hour before the actual time you wish to finish the fire.  This is especially important if you have an open fire or open woodburning stove.  Place a fireguard in front of the fire or close the doors on a woodburner just in case any embers ‘spit’…this is not very likely but is a good precaution none the less.

Please take a look at our article on the dangers of slumbering your woodburner.

Honeywell Carbon Monoxide Alarm

CARBON MONOXIDE ALARMS

Two rules: HAVE ONE and TEST IT regularly! Look out for #TestitTuesday when you can test that and your smoke alarm…

CHECK YOUR TERMINALS

See Day 4!

ANNUAL SWEEPING

As a minimum you should have your chimney swept annually unless you know you have used it significantly more, in which case, also have a sweep half way through the burning season.

The best time to have a sweep is when you stop using the fireplace. A good sweep will be able to advise you if you need to change the frequency of sweeping –and on the quality of the soot or debris removed.

Your insurer may impose conditions on frequency of sweeping – do check so you don’t get caught out…

Safety first…

Louise

Franchise Director

Stove liner collapse – burning the wrong fuel

Woodburners and multi-fuel stoves are fantastic. They look good, they’re cleaner and their warmth output is greater than open fires. But…and you knew there was one coming…they can be trouble if you aren’t careful.

Simply put, there is typically a steel liner installed from your stove up your chimney to take away the smoke. And this often catches out new owners of stoves. The problem is that stainless steel doesn’t last forever – and is quickly corroded if you burn wood and coal or smokeless fuel together – even in a multi-fuel stove.

This liner was installed in 2011 and gave up after 5 years. Whilst there is definitely a warranty on most of these flues, there is also a protocol regarding what to burn. Multi-fuel stoves –designed to burn both coal and wood – should only burn one or the other. Combinations of fuel can lead to production of a mild acid that can destroy stainless steel.

Using a reputable HETAS installer, following the instructions regarding the stove use and having the flue regularly swept will help but burning the correct fuel and not mixing fuels is essential – and not something that is widely known.

Unfortunately this customer will have to have her flue replaced and will undoubtedly feel despondent at having to make a further investment. It is the second one this month that our team have been called to sweep and it doesn’t make for good news.

Keep safe this winter – book a sweep now so you’re ready for the cooler season and, if problems occur you have time to resolve them!

For more information on this HETAS is a good place to start…there are some excellent booklets available that are free to download: HETAS

Hetas

Steel liner collapse

Steel liner collapse

Steel Liner corrosion

 

Why Choose a…
Wilkins Chimney Sweep
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